Faq

The questions most frequently asked by members about Medicare are:

Why do I have to pay the Medicare Part B premium?

Part B is insurance for outpatient medical care, such as doctor visits, preventive services, ambulance services, mental health costs and the cost of durable medical equipment. The standard monthly premium for Part B is $148.50 in 2021 and $170.10 in 2022. It is higher for Medicare beneficiaries with higher incomes.

I heard that by having my Medicare I can get an increase in my pension/Social Security check?

There are several requirements and resources please call us to review your options.

What is the difference between Medical and Medicare?

Medicare provides health coverage to those over 65 or those with a severe disability, regardless of income, while Medi-Cal (the Medicaid program managed and funded by the State of California) provides health coverage to those families with very low incomes, as well as pregnant women and the blind, among others.

Can I get Medicare and Medical?

If you qualify for full-scope Medi-Cal (Medi-Cal without Share of Cost (SOC), Medi-Cal will also cover your Medicare Part A and B deductibles and co-payments and pay your monthly Medicare Part B premium. If you have both Medicare and Medi-Cal, how you receive your benefits depends on the county in which you live.

How do I apply for Medicare?

Contact us at 1800-479-1033 for assistance.

Why doesn't my Medicare cover everything?

Medicare does not cover everything, but we can help you find the plan that best fits your needs.

I want to know if I have Parts A, B, C and D and what they mean.

Call us to review your information Part A provides inpatient/hospital inpatient coverage. Part B provides outpatient/medical coverage. Part C offers an alternative way to receive your Medicare benefits (see below for more information). Part D provides prescription drug coverage.

How do I access Medicare?

Medicare is generally available to people age 65 and older, younger people with disabilities, and people with end-stage renal disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or transplantation). Medicare consists of two parts, Part A (hospitalization insurance) and Part B (sickness insurance). You are eligible for premium-free Part A if you are 65 or older and you or your spouse have worked and paid Medicare taxes for at least 10 years. You can get Part A at age 65 without having to pay premiums if:
• You receive retirement benefits from Social Security or the Railroad Retirement Board.
• You are entitled to receive Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board benefits but have not yet applied for them.
• You or your spouse had government employment covered by Medicare.

Can I have both Medicare and insurance from work?

Yes, you can have both Medicare and health insurance provided by your employer. In most cases, you will be entitled to Medicare coverage when you turn 65, even if you are still working and enrolled in your company's health plan.

Where does Medicare reimbursement come from, who pays for it, and when does it begin?

1. You are enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B.
2. You no longer receive government or other assistance for your Part B premium.
You live in the ZIP code service area of a plan that offers this program.
4. You are enrolled in an MA plan that offers a reimbursement benefit.

Why do I have to pay the medicare part b premium?

Part B is insurance for outpatient medical care such as doctor visits, preventative services, ambulance services, mental health costs, and the cost of durable medical equipment. The standard monthly fee for Part B is $148.50 in 2021 and $170.10 in 2022. It is higher for Medicare recipients who have higher incomes.

I heard by having my Medicare I can get an increase on my pension/social security check?

There are several qualifications and resources please call us to review your options.

What’s the difference between Medical & Medicare?

Medicare provides health coverage to individuals 65 and older or those with a severe disability regardless of income, whereas Medi-Cal (California's state-run and funded Medicaid program) provides health coverage to those families with very low income, as well as pregnant women and the blind, among others.

Can I have medicare and Medical?

If you qualify for full Medi-Cal (Medi-Cal without a share of cost (SOC)), Medi-Cal will also cover your Medicare Part A and B deductibles and copayments, and pay your monthly Medicare Part B premium. If you have both Medicare and Medi-Cal, how you receive your benefits depends on the county you live in.

How do I apply for Medicare?

Contact us at 1800-479-1033 to further assist you

Why is my Medicare not covering everything?

Medicare does not cover everything, but we can help you find a plan that best suits your needs.

I want to know if I have parts A, B, C, and D ? and what do they mean?

Call us to review your information, Part A provides inpatient/hospital coverage. Part B provides outpatient/medical coverage. Part C offers an alternate way to receive your Medicare benefits (see below for more information). Part D provides prescription drug coverage.

How do I qualify for Medicare?

Generally, Medicare is available for people age 65 or older, younger people with disabilities and people with End Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or transplant). Medicare has two parts, Part A (Hospital Insurance) and Part B (Medicare Insurance). You are eligible for premium-free Part A if you are age 65 or older and you or your spouse worked and paid Medicare taxes for at least 10 years. You can get Part A at age 65 without having to pay premiums if:

● You are receiving retirement benefits from Social Security or the Railroad Retirement Board.
● You are eligible to receive Social Security or Railroad benefits but you have not yet filed for them.
● You or your spouse had Medicare-covered government employment.

Can I have both Medicare and work insurance?

Yes, you can have both Medicare and employer-provided health insurance. In most cases, you will become eligible for Medicare coverage when you turn 65, even if you are still working and enrolled in your employer's health plan.

Where is the medicare reimbursement coming from? Who is paying for it? and When does it start?

1. Are enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B
2. Do not already receive government or other assistance for your Part B premium
3. Live in the zip code service area of a plan that offers this program
4. Enroll in an MA plan that provides a giveback benefit